These Logs of Coffee Grounds Are a Lifeline for Encamped Refugees

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Instead of throwing out the grounds leftover from morning pots of coffee, these University of Toronto students are turning them into a valuable resource for refugees overseas.

Women and children in refugee camps reportedly perform 90% of their cooking using firewood. Family members are often put in danger when leaving the camp to gather more firewood, and it can be a strenuous hours-long endeavor.

 Instead of throwing out the grounds leftover from morning pots of coffee, these University of Toronto students are turning them into a valuable resource for refugees overseas.

Women and children in refugee camps reportedly perform 90% of their cooking using firewood. Family members are often put in danger when leaving the camp to gather more firewood, and it can be a strenuous hours-long endeavor.

“As soon as they’re out of the camp, they’re unsafe and that leaves them open to assault,” Bennett told CBC Toronto. “Moto logs prevent the dangers associated with that, but also frees women up to spend time doing other things, whether that’s trying to find another source of revenue or spending time educating their kids.”

The team currently collects coffee grounds from local Starbucks, Second Cup, and Tim Hortons outlets. As they continue to develop their prototype, the students plan on creating a simple recipe that can be replicated regardless of location or coffee shop availability.

(WATCH the CTV News video below)

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